My Classroom is Not a Safe Space

Usually, it’s a man who says it. He wants conversation to go deeper. He’s hoping for more self-disclosure. With the best of intentions, he wants to move past the mundane. He desires this time to be different. So he says, “Go ahead. Share. This is a safe space.” Except, no it isn’t.

When Faith Goes to College . . . And Joins the Wrestling Team

I have a post up today on the new Bearings blog of the new BTS Center. Teaser below, but head to the Bearings blog for the full post. Considering the amount of online commentary available concerning the millennial generation and the future of the church, the relative dearth of attention paid to young adults’ experience […]

5 Stodgy, Ridiculous, Unrealistic Ways to Fix College

These ideas are “stodgy” because in many ways I see them as going back to practices of the past. Like, #1: no college credit for high school courses…

Designing a new course, “Word to the Wise,” Want to help?

Next semester, I’m planning to teach “Word to the Wise: Writing for Religious and Social Change.” I’m posting my thoughts on the course design thus far with the hope that you, dear Internets, will suggest tweaks, correct horrendous ideas, and/or send me more boxes of books to read.

In Praise of the Archbishop of Doubt

In a click-obsessed world it’s not surprising that the archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Rev. Justin Welby, drew some gasping headlines last week. But for me, the truly noteworthy story would have occurred if Welby responded, “No, never have I ever doubted.

Choosing What’s Best for College

As college begins, student faces hundreds of new choices. But what if we opened ourselves to the uncomfortable notion that you don’t always have to choose. Life’s moments have a funny way of choosing you.

Sabbath for Professors…and Students?

As the school year begins, I’m considering an “email Sabbath” clause for my syllabi. But does that mean students, too, should take a day to rest?

What is Digital Humanities? (in 400 words or less)

For my last blog post for Texts, Maps, Networks: Digital Methods in the Humanities, I’d like to respond to a question I get fairly often. “What is digital humanities?” Since those who ask it come from all walks of life—churchy, professory, friendy—I’m going to attempt to go both deep and wide in, well, exactly 400 words. Here goes nothing…

Should We Kill the Essay? Is It Dead Already?

If no boss is ever going to require employees to write an essay, why should professors assign them?