Writing Theologically: Writing Digitally

A few weeks ago I received a fun surprise package in the mail: Writing Theologically, edited by my friend and future colleague at Luther Seminary, Eric D. Barreto. Along with the books Reading Theologically, and Thinking Theologically, which came out a few months earlier, Writing Theologically serves as a foundation for learning for those considering or […]

Student writing gone public: blogging the classroom

In my Word to the Wise: Writing for Religious and Social Change course, students engage in two main types of writing assignments. First there’s Digital Writing Assignments, all of which they post on their personal blogs. Options include, for example: Write a post reflecting on a time you changed your mind. Record and post a video […]

Sundry Summer Celebrations

I’m not sure what constitutes the official “end of summer” these days, but I think it’s here for me. Faculty workshops have replaced writing time. Syllabus prep has replaced reading time. New, longer lists of to-dos have replaced my unfinished lists of summer projects. Ready or not, it’s back to school…

Visualizing Recent PC(USA) Sexuality & Marriage Decisions

Have you ever wondered: what would happen if I built a digital representation of important PC(USA) ordination stands, sexuality, and marriage votes from 1996 forward? Of course, not. That’s ridiculous. What sort of nerdy, tech-curious, Presbyterian pastor and professor-type would want to do such a thing? Ummm…. Ok, well, this summer I did [click here now to jump […]

What is Digital Humanities? (in 400 words or less)

For my last blog post for Texts, Maps, Networks: Digital Methods in the Humanities, I’d like to respond to a question I get fairly often. “What is digital humanities?” Since those who ask it come from all walks of life—churchy, professory, friendy—I’m going to attempt to go both deep and wide in, well, exactly 400 words. Here goes nothing…

:-|On that Controversial Facebook Emotion Study

The best controversies are those in which the headlines make you think one thing, but the full article pushes you another way. Eventually, you say, “I have no idea what to think on this one.” That happened to me this week when investigating Facebook’s social experiment on happiness, the experiment conducted without that little thing called “informed consent.”

Radical Hospitality & the Rooster Soup Company

Help support a new Kickstarter venture, a partnership between Broad Street Ministry and Federal Donuts. It’s a great idea: to use high-quality leftover chicken backs & bones that would go to waste, make delicious soup to sell, and donate 100% of our profits to Broad Street Ministry.

500 Lifetimes of Books & the Screwmeneutical Imperative

If you went to the Library of Congress and read a book every day from birth to death, it’d take you 500 lifetimes to finish. What to do? Enter: the “Screwmeneutical Imperative.”

The Word Made Pixel: On Bible Apps

How does a Bible app change the way we encounter the Bible? Does it affect one’s theology of scripture? Does a Bible app actually change what Christians do in worship?  A few experiences in class and leading chapel this week at Concordia have wondering. In an article, “The App of God” in the July 2013 […]